A Guide To What To Eat For Dinner After Stomach Bug 

    A Guide To What To Eat For Dinner After Stomach Bug

    Martin Alvarez

    Martin Alvarez
    Nutritionist/Dietitian Professional Guide

    Updated on 12/3/2022

    What To Eat For Dinner After Stomach Bug? Have you recovered from your stomach sickness, and are you ready to rejoin society? These are the kinds of foods that will help you regain your strength after a bout with the stomach flu.

    What To Eat When You Have An Infectious Stomach Ailment

    You've probably been there before: You've been struck down by a particularly terrible case of the stomach flu or an unexpected food poisoning episode. You're feeling weak and shaky, but you're finally ready to eat something. In this article, trained dietitians provide their advice on how to rehydrate properly and what foods to eat after having a stomach illness so that you may begin to feel like a normal, functioning human being again. 

    But before you start thinking about what foods you should eat after the stomach flu, you should probably list the things you should avoid while fighting the stomach bug. This will ensure that you do not make the suffering worse. Sheri Kasper, R.DN., a registered dietitian and the co-founder of Fresh Communications, recommends that individuals first and foremost abstain from consuming coffee because it can potentially irritate the stomach and may exacerbate some symptoms, such as diarrhea. "It's also vital to avoid alcohol because the objective soon after having stomach flu is to replace fluids, and alcohol is a diuretic, which increases fluid loss," she says. "It's crucial to avoid alcohol because it's important to replace fluids right after having stomach flu." "Highly acidic foods, like tomatoes, or spicy foods, can cause nausea or stomach pain. Thus, it is important to approach both types of foods cautiously."

    Something Unremarkable

    Something Unremarkable

    Many medical professionals suggest following the BRAT diet (bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast) for the first few days after getting a stomach illness. This diet consists of bland meals that are easy to digest. After having stomach flu, it is vital to consume bland foods initially. Katie Pfeffer-Scanlan, R.D., creator of One Hungry Bunny and a licensed dietitian, recommends that once your symptoms have subsided, you should gradually reintroduce different foods you enjoy eating.

    "These early ventures back into the land of solid food are also when you want to start consuming more fluids," says Jessica Spiro, R.D., a registered dietician based in California. "This is when you want to start rebalancing electrolytes and gently easing digestion." Dehydration is the most common and severe complication that follows an episode of food poisoning or the stomach flu; therefore, replacing lost fluids is of the utmost importance. The best strategies to rehydrate include drinking soup or smoothies and eating fruits and vegetables that are high in water content (think cucumbers and watermelon).

    Coconut Water

    Coconut Water

    According to Thérèse Bonanni, R.D., a registered dietician at the Navesink Wellness Center in New Jersey, coconut water is an excellent alternative to sugary sports drinks during and after a stomach virus. It's her go-to beverage for "a natural amount of electrolytes without added sugar to replenish and hydrate," as it's loaded with potassium and an excellent source of other vital nutrients like salt, magnesium, and phosphorus.

    Pedialyte

    Pedialyte is a sports drink. This vividly colored drink is not intended solely for children, despite its appearance. Some medical professionals and dietitians recommend that adults drink Pedialyte to avoid or treat dehydration. This can be especially beneficial if you seek something to drink after having stomach flu.

    Angie Asche, R.D., founder of Eleat Sports Nutrition and a registered dietician, says, "I frequently prescribe Pedialyte to assist clients in replenishing their electrolytes because it is easy on the stomach, particularly the unflavored variety." You may purchase it as a solution online or at your neighborhood pharmacy, and it also comes in powder packets that you can dilute with water. 

    Yogurt

    Yogurt

    After you have recovered from your gastrointestinal distress, Bonanni suggests you "give kefir and yogurt a try" to restore the good bacteria in your stomach. According to Asche, this is one of the most refined foods to eat after a stomach virus since it introduces more protein, which will help balance your blood sugar, help you avoid energy-sucking collapses, and help you feel stronger—avoiding lactose. Consider consuming a non-dairy yogurt that contains a significant amount of protein and advantageous microbes. Plain yogurt is your best bet in general, but even the fruit-flavored varieties are lower in sugar and do not include any artificial sweeteners. These are two sneaky irritants you'll want to clear when deciding what to eat when dealing with a stomach virus or belly bug.

    Fermented Foods

    Fermented Foods

    Gabriella Vetere, R.D.N., author of Macro balanced and a registered dietitian, recommends that once you can tolerate liquids and foods that are not very flavorful, you should begin consuming probiotic-rich foods at least once per day. You might also try other fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchee, or miso in addition to yogurt and kefir. There is also kombucha, which is a fermented tea beverage. Edwina Clark, R.D., a registered dietician in San Francisco, cites kombucha as one of her beverages of choice. Which one is it? Kombucha with ginger "to alleviate nausea and replace fluids" and "repair gut bacteria."

    Not into the fermented foods and drinks thing? You could try taking a supplement that contains probiotics; however, because the F.D.A. does not regulate supplements, it is essential to discuss any changes to your routine with your primary care physician first. If you want to repopulate the G.I. tract with healthy bacteria, you should look for a supplement that contains numerous strains of bacteria. This is because each specific variety of bacteria performs a slightly different function.

    Smoothies

    Smoothies

    According to Charlene Pors, R.D.N., a registered dietitian at Euphoria Nutrition, if you aren't ready for a full meal, can't take the notion of yogurt, or have lactose intolerance (a transitory issue of a G.I. virus), try a dairy-free smoothie.

    "Smoothies made with soy milk, fruit, and nut butter may be a fantastic high-protein and healthy meal, to begin with, because they are low in fiber and lactose, which makes them easier to digest," explains Pors. "These smoothies are also a terrific way to get in some extra nutrients."

    Soup With Chicken And Noodles

    Soup With Chicken And Noodles

    According to Linzy Ziegelbaum, R.D., a certified dietician based in New York, chicken noodle soup and toast are two of the finest meals to eat after having stomach flu. After a bout with a stomach bug, your body will respond favorably to this tried-and-true home cure. She explains that the broth provides the body with fluids, the chicken provides protein, and the pasta and bread provide carbohydrates. She also mentions that it is typically quite bland, making it easier to tolerate even for those with sensitive stomachs.

    Lean Protein

    Lean Protein

    It is essential to give higher priority to those foods that will assist you in regaining your strength while making decisions about what foods to eat after having stomach flu or when you have an upset stomach. The best illustration of this is what Kasper refers to as "lean protein," which he defines as "protein-rich diets that are low in calories, cholesterol, and total fat—particularly saturated fat." She notes, "Eggs are a fantastic choice because they contain protein and a wide array of nutrients to help repair any nutritional imbalances." "Eggs are a great choice because they contain protein and a wide array of nutrients."

    According to Kasper, if eggs aren't your thing, mildly spiced lean meats like baked chicken or turkey breast are also good options. She says, "Bone broth is also a nice idea." "Compared to ordinary broth, this one has a significantly higher protein content and can also assist restore fluids."