Diabetic Meal Plan Based On The Mediterranean Diet For Diabetics

    Diabetic Meal Plan

    Martin Alvarez

    Martin Alvarez
    Nutritionist/Dietitian Professional Guide

    Updated on 12/3/2022

    Keeping your blood sugar in check while indulging in the delicious and beneficial tastes of a Mediterranean diet for diabetics may be accomplished with the help of this simple meal plan for a week.

    In the year 2022, U.S. News & World Report has determined that the Mediterranean diet for diabetics is one of the world's most excellent and the best diet for diabetes. There is a full explanation for this. Several studies have shown that living an active and healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even certain types of cancer. It is essential to understand that the Mediterranean diet isn't as much a set of dietary guidelines as it is a way of life. Despite restrictions on sweets, refined grains, sugars, and red meat, fruit and vegetables are encouraged, whole grains, beans and legumes, seafood, nuts, and seeds, along with plenty of unsaturated fats.

    The Mediterranean diet focuses on what we eat and how we eat them, so it's more than just the foods we consume. Eating more relaxedly and savoring each bite of our food rather than rushing through our meals or shoveling food in front of the television may not only be beneficial to our physical health but also make our food seem more gratifying. There is an objective to this diet, which is to reduce your body weight by between one and two pounds per week, which plays a vital role in controlling your blood sugar levels if you have type 2 diabetes, which is why weight loss plays such an essential role in regulating your blood sugar levels. If maintaining your current weight is more important to you than cutting calories, we've given options to adjust the calorie count of this mouthwatering Mediterranean diet plan to either 1,500 or 2,000 per day, depending on your preferences.

    Why A Mediterranean Diet Should Be Considered When Managing Diabetes

    Mediterranean Diet

    The Mediterranean diet is beneficial for diabetic patients for several different reasons. To begin, it may be bent easily. Not only is it counterproductive to stick to a strict diet plan that prohibits certain foods over the long run, but it also makes it difficult to enjoy meals with your family. Managing diabetes requires making changes to one's lifestyle, such as preparing more meals at home, engaging in more physical activity, eating a diet rich in nutritious foods from the Mediterranean region, which are known to assist with diabetes management, and avoiding foods that quickly raise blood sugar levels (like sugar, sweets and refined grains). If you have diabetes, your risk of heart disease increases, which is why the Mediterranean diet is such a good option: it is rich in heart-healthy unsaturated fats while limiting the saturated fats that come from red meat, sweets (like baked goods), and high-fat dairy products. The Mediterranean diet is an excellent choice if you want to lower your heart disease risk. In addition, it contains a large quantity of high-fiber foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables, lentils, and whole grains, all of which may assist in better controlling blood sugar levels. Because fiber is digested more slowly than other foods, it reduces the rate at which sugar is absorbed into the system. This makes it more effective at preventing rises in blood sugar levels.

    Diabetes-Friendly Foods From The Mediterranean:

    Diabetes-Friendly Foods

    • Fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables are a great way to keep your blood sugar levels in a healthy range, so it's essential to consume lots of them, regardless of whether they're fresh or frozen.
    • Both fresh and frozen fruit are excellent choices when it comes to this food group. Berries, plums, and apples are examples of fruits that are rich in fiber and should be prioritized in your fruit consumption.
    • Whole Grains: Quinoa, muesli, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal, whole-wheat bread, and bulgur are just some of the healthful whole-grain alternatives that are available.
    • Fiber may be found in abundance in legumes like beans and lentils. If you are going to use canned beans, you should attempt to choose ones with low salt content and then rinse them before using them to remove even more sodium.
    • Fish: Fish is an excellent choice, particularly species rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel.
    • You should regularly consume unsaturated fats such as those found in nuts, seeds, avocados, and olive oil as a part of a balanced diet.

    Want to Acquire Further Knowledge? Check out The Mediterranean Diet for Beginners: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started for more information.

    How To Plan And Prepare Your Meals For The Week:

    Meals For The Week FOR Mediterranean

    1. Create a big batch of Maple Granola so you can snack on it all week.
    2. Get the Olive Orange Vinaigrette ready to use throughout the week.
    3. Put together the Vegan Superfood Buddha Bowls to enjoy for lunch on days 2, 3, 4, and 5.
    4. On days 2 and 3, make enough of the Date and Pine Nut Overnight Oatmeal for two servings each so that you may enjoy it in the morning.

    Day 1

    Day 1

    Morning meal (300 calories)

    • 1 cup of nonfat Greek yogurt in its plain form
    • One-third of a cup of raspberries
    • Granola with Maple Syrup, one serving

    A.M. Snack (131 calories)

    • One huge pear

    Lunch (293 calories)

    • a single portion of Salmon-Stuffed Avocados

    P.M. Snack (79 calories)

    • a third of a cup of blackberries
    • Six unsalted almonds

    Dinner (387 calories)

    • Portobello Mushrooms Stuffed with Caprese and Served in One Serving
    • a piece of whole-wheat baguette weighing 1 ounce
    • 2 cups of a variety of greens
    • 1 serving Olive Orange Vinaigrette

    1,218 milligrams of sodium, 1,190 calories, 63 grams of protein, 117 grams of carbs, 30 grams of fiber, 59 grams of fat, 10 grams of saturated fat

    To get the total to 1,500 calories, increase the afternoon snack to a third of a cup of unsalted almonds and add a quarter of an avocado to the supper.

    To make it a 2,000-calorie day, include all of the alterations for the 1,500-calorie day, add one slice of whole-wheat bread to breakfast with two tablespoons of natural peanut butter, add 1/4 cup of walnut halves to the morning snack, and add one plum to lunch.

    Day 2

    Lunch (381 calories)

    Morning meal (281 calories)

    • Overnight Oatmeal with Dates and Pine Nuts, one serving

    A.M. Snack (61 calories)

    • Two plums

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • One vegan and gluten free superfood Buddha bowl serving

    P.M. Snack (95 calories)

    • One medium apple

    Dinner (383 calories)

    • One portion of oven-baked salmon served with charred onions and radishes seasoned with Old Bay.
    • One portion of roasted fresh green beans is served as a dish.

    Totals for the day are as follows: 1,200 calories, 55 grams of protein, 146 grams of carbs, 31 grams of fiber, 51 grams of fat, and 1,058 milligrams of sodium.

    To get the total to 1,500 calories: Include one peach in your lunch and two tablespoons of natural peanut butter in your afternoon snack.

    Include all of the changes for the day with 1,500 calories, plus add 1/3 cup unsalted almonds to the morning snack and one serving of guacamole chopped salad to the evening meal. This will bring the total to 2,000 calories.

    Day 3

    Dinner (499 calories)

    Morning meal (281 calories)

    • Overnight Oatmeal with Dates and Pine Nuts, one serving

    A.M. Snack (32 calories)

    • 1/2 cup raspberries

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • One vegan and gluten-free superfood Buddha bowl serving

    P.M. Snack (31 calories)

    • a half a cup of blackberries

    Dinner (499 calories)

    • One portion of Chicken and Vegetables Baked on a Sheet Pan with Romesco Sauce.

    Totals for the day are as follows: 1,224 calories, 58 grams of protein, 135 grams of carbs, 31 grams of fiber, 55 grams of fat, and 1,004 milligrams of sodium.

    To get the total to 1,500 calories: Include a morning snack of a third of a cup of unsalted almonds.

    Include all of the modifications for the 1,500-calorie day. Add one slice of whole-wheat toast topped with one and a half tablespoons of natural peanut butter for breakfast, and add one cup of nonfat plain Greek yogurt topped with one serving of maple granola for an afternoon snack. This will bring the total calorie count up to 2,000.

    Day 4

    Dinner (479 calories)

    Morning meal (294 calories)

    • One serving of plain Greek yogurt without added fat and sugar
    • a quarter of a cup of blackberries
    • Granola with Maple Syrup, one serving

    A.M. Snack (30 calories)

    • One plum

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • One vegan and gluten-free superfood Buddha bowl serving

    P.M. Snack (35 calories)

    • One clementine

    Dinner (479 calories)

    • One portion of garlic shrimp and asparagus kebabs with asparagus
    • 1 serve Quinoa Avocado Salad

    1,219 calories a day, 58 grams of protein, 136 grams of carbs, 33 grams of fiber, 56 grams of fat, and 813 milligrams of salt

    To make the afternoon snack include 1,500 calories, add a third of a cup of unsalted almonds.

    Include all of the alterations for the 1,500-calorie day, add two pieces of whole-wheat bread with three tablespoons of natural peanut butter to the morning snack, and increase the number of clementines to 2 for the afternoon snack. This will bring the total to 2,000 calories.

    A helpful hint for meal preparation is to make three portions of apple cinnamon chia pudding to consume for breakfast on days 5, 6, and 7.

    Day 5

    Day 5

    Morning meal (233 calories)

    • Chia pudding with apple cinnamon and one serving

    A.M. Snack (84 calories)

    • One miniature pear

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • One vegan and gluten-free superfood Buddha bowl serving

    P.M. Snack (59 calories)

    • One medium peach

    Dinner (448 calories)

    • Polenta and Slow-Cooker Chicken Cacciatore, portioned for one serving

    A helpful hint for meal preparation is to save aside two portions of the Slow-Cooker Chicken Cacciatore with Polenta and store them in the refrigerator. You may have them for lunch on Days 6 and 7.

    1,205 calories, 61 grams of protein, 146 grams of carbs, 35 grams of fiber, 46 grams of fat, and 946 milligrams of salt make up an average daily diet.

    To make the afternoon snack include 1,500 calories, add a third of a cup of unsalted almonds.

    Include all of the changes for the day with 1,500 calories, plus add one slice of whole-wheat bread with two tablespoons of natural peanut butter for breakfast, and add one-third of a cup of walnut halves for your morning snack. This will bring the total to 2,000 calories.

    Day 6

    Day 6

    Morning meal (233 calories)

    • Chia pudding with apple cinnamon and one serving

    A.M. Snack (95 calories)

    • One medium apple

    Lunch (448 calories)

    • Polenta and Slow-Cooker Chicken Cacciatore, portioned for one serving

    P.M. Snack (88 calories)

    • 2/3 cup sliced cucumber
    • Three tablespoons of hummus

    Dinner (351 calories)

    • One portion of butternut squash chili with black beans that is vegetarian-friendly
    • 2 cups of a variety of greens
    • 1 serving Olive Orange Vinaigrette

    Totals for the day: 1,215 calories; 60 grams of protein; 145 grams of carbs; 38 grams of fiber; 46 grams of fat; and 1,508 milligrams of sodium

    To get the total to 1,500 calories: Include a morning snack of a third of a cup of unsalted almonds.

    To make it a 2,000-calorie day, include all of the alterations that were made for the 1,500-calorie day, in addition to adding 12 walnut halves to the afternoon snack, one slice of whole-wheat bread with 1 1/2 tablespoons of peanut butter to breakfast, and adding half of an avocado to supper.

    Day 7

    Day 7

    Morning meal (233 calories)

    • Chia pudding with apple cinnamon and one serving

    A.M. Snack (42 calories)

    • a third of a cup of raspberries

    Lunch (448 calories)

    • Polenta and Slow-Cooker Chicken Cacciatore, portioned for one serving

    P.M. Snack (41 calories)

    • a third of a cup of blackberries

    Dinner (432 calories)

    • One portion of a salad with chicken, Brussels sprouts, and mushrooms

    1,197 calories, 70 grams of protein, 100 grams of carbs, 30 grams of fiber, 58 grams of fat, and 1,291 milligrams of salt make up an average day.

    To make the afternoon snack include 1,500 calories, add a third of a cup of unsalted almonds.

    Include all of the changes for the day with 1,500 calories, plus add one banana to breakfast and two slices of whole-wheat bread with two and a half tablespoons of natural peanut butter to the morning snack. This will bring the total to 2,000 calories.

    Not to be Missed!

    Diabetes Diet Meal Plan

    • The Mediterranean Diet for Diabetics is a meal plan based on the Mediterranean Diet for Diabetics.
    • Recipes for a healthy diet based on the Mediterranean
    • Recipes that help manage diabetes.
    • Diabetes Diet Meal Plan
    • Diabetes-Friendly Mediterranean Diet Dinners